Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
NYFF 2017: Let The Sunshine In

NYFF 2017: Let The Sunshine In

Bestowed soul and spirit by Juliette Binoche’s minimalist performance, Isabelle encounters a series of invariably disappointing romantic ventures.
Latest entries
The Holy Night

The Holy Night

Notari alludes to an idealized Italy, one without women in metaphorical chains, where torment isn’t romanticized, and where members of the lower class are seen as more than just creatures.
Cameraperson

Cameraperson

Cameraperson shows to its audience not just a woman, her life, and her body of work, but the power of the camera itself as a means of capturing the breadth of emotion humanity has to offer.
The Watermelon Woman

The Watermelon Woman

Double Exposure is celebrating the 20th anniversary of Cheryl Dunye's iconic debut, The Watermelon Woman, by posting a newly edited version of Alex Robertson's longform piece on the film from our 8th print issue.
NYFF 2016: My Journey Through French Cinema

NYFF 2016: My Journey Through French Cinema

In trying to pierce much too quickly and much too forcefully into the truth and beauty at the heart of cinema, Tavernier unfortunately overlooks the potential wider impact of his own encounters with movies.
Claire's Knee

Claire’s Knee

A film like Claire’s Knee is not merely a circus of irony, a spectacle of negative energy: clearly one must take some sort of base enjoyment in the lengthy, digressive musings of Rohmer’s characters that is not reducible to scoffing at their myopia.
Sound & Vision: Midnight Cowboy

Sound & Vision: Midnight Cowboy

Adulthood, one gathers, is the process of becoming one’s self, of shedding pretend play and impossible dreams in exchange for a fuller sense of self-recognition.
Jane and Charlotte Forever: A Family Legacy of Female Transgression

Jane and Charlotte Forever: A Family Legacy of Female Transgression

In both Gainsbourg and Birkin’s films, female characters dismantle structures that are commonly criticized in feminist film theory, but often they go even further.
Fort Buchanan

Fort Buchanan

Crotty is far less interested in exploring military service than the sexual limbo and interpersonal complications it necessitates.
I Knew Her Well

I Knew Her Well

The deep tragedy of the film is Adriana's inability to anchor herself to anything concrete or stable that would secure her investment in being a part of this world.
Sternberg and Dietrich: Vamping The Dream

Sternberg and Dietrich: Vamping The Dream

Whereas Sternberg’s need to make his settings emphatically real on the surface level obstructs a genuine feeling of reality, Dietrich’s characters are so fictitiously composed that even the slightest breach feels like penetrating into the core of human emotion.
Day of Wrath

Day of Wrath

Day of Wrath can be read as an account of the panic that ensues when marginalized individuals actively seek agency—a threat to established power remedied with vehement accusations, forced confessions and, ultimately, death.
Animated Streaming Pick: Is the Man Who is Tall Happy?

Animated Streaming Pick: Is the Man Who is Tall Happy?

Gondry seems to conclude that when we watch animation we are more conscious of the effort it took to create (and therefore of the presence of the artist) than when we watch live-action film. He’s not wrong.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers