Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Festivals
NYFF 2015: The Boys From Fengkuei

NYFF 2015: The Boys From Fengkuei

The lengthiest shots in the film focus primarily on individuals—characters in between actions, just sitting, thinking, staring off into the distance, wholly preoccupied with that primary adolescent pastime of brooding.
NYFF 2015: Baumbach Charts New Territory In a Well-Worn Genre

NYFF 2015: Baumbach Charts New Territory In a Well-Worn Genre

It’s like gawking at Whistler’s Mother in the Mussée D’Orsay while Whistler himself stands over your shoulder and talks to you about it.
NYFF 2015: 4 Takes on Nathaniel Dorsky / Jerome Hiler

NYFF 2015: 4 Takes on Nathaniel Dorsky / Jerome Hiler

Dorsky and Hiler know the value of absence, of dark space—the film artist’s equivalent of the painter’s blank canvas, or the writer’s blank page.
NYFF 2015: Black Girl

NYFF 2015: Black Girl

The bulk of the film makes us beg as she does for something to alleviate what, after just twenty minutes of interior shots of the French apartment, can feel like an endless entrapment.
NYFF 2015: Insiang

NYFF 2015: Insiang

Insiang ruthlessly exposes how the slums of the Philippines thoroughly consumed its inhabitants.
NYFF 2015: The Witness

NYFF 2015: The Witness

Kitty Genovese’s life has disappeared behind her public, dramatic, and eminently watchable death. We, as the audience, are transformed into cruel spectators, craning our necks to see footage of bloody handprints and desperate screaming, reifying her tragedy by refusing her a life before death at all.
NYFF 2015: De Palma, "De Palma," and Baumbach

NYFF 2015: De Palma, “De Palma,” and Baumbach

Much as De Palma is at his most original and his most political when he “does” Hitchcock, Baumbach is at his proudest, his most creative, and his most ambitious when he points the camera at his subject and listens.
NYFF 2015: Ran

NYFF 2015: Ran

Simplicity, indeed, is almost a habit with Kurosawa: never in his films did he tend towards the obscure, though this simplicity is not without intellectual depth.
NYFF 2015: Journey to the Shore

NYFF 2015: Journey to the Shore

There’s no denying that a lumbering, episodic structure such as this movie possesses can only be further deadened by the detectable calculation of where each episode will take us.
NYFF 2015: Cemetery of Splendour

NYFF 2015: Cemetery of Splendour

Apichatpong can find life in anything, even the ceiling fans that hang above the sleeping soldiers, the hi-res camera “freezing” their rotating blades.
Parabellum

Parabellum

Our cultural assumption, in dystopian films, is that the morally upright, empathetic, and resourceful band of survivors will succeed and reestablish society. But to Rinner, these assumptions specifically play off both the simplification and commodification of disaster scenarios.
Cannes Capsules

Cannes Capsules

Mommy leaves a strange aftertaste, a too-bright bitterness, mostly thanks to Pilon’s impressive slippage into his role...Mommy is provocative and funny, brilliant and frank, and altogether better than any of Dolan’s four previous films.
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