Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Features
Summer Views: Matthew Rivera

Summer Views: Matthew Rivera

For Rohmer, himself a cinephile of the most avid variety, summer is not a time of planned activity so much as planned inactivity that, in turn, allows for only the most passive of vacations.
Double Exposure 2014 Year End Contributor's Poll

Double Exposure 2014 Year End Contributor’s Poll

The results of Double Exposure's 2014 Year End Contributor's Poll! Plus contributors on the films for which they were the lone booster.
To Save and Project

To Save and Project

The exciting possibilities of more extensive 3D restoration are clear from this first showcase. The different films provided a broad range of interesting, well-crafted cinema, in re-mastered versions of their intended format, otherwise lost to the past.
Waters Waters Everywhere

Waters Waters Everywhere

There were indeed multiple maniacs.
Second Dimensions: You Are Your Own Voyeur

Second Dimensions: You Are Your Own Voyeur

Scarlett Johansson as the alien skinwalker in Under the Skin becomes her own voyeur, internalizing the reactions of others, imagining and wondering about her body as an object.
Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik

These are problematic that become increasingly relevant in an age where our social and visual relations are more and more defined by our technologies. Increasingly the push against these factors has increased, but Paik’s exhibit asks us to find something different in these problems: joy.
Fatale Attractions

Fatale Attractions

The Femme Fatale—one of the most recognizable motifs in the pulp universe, and the inspiration for an extensive current repertory series at Film Forum—is as essential a component of American noir as jazz, black and white photography, and urban hopelessness.
The Title Sequences of Alfred Hitchcock

The Title Sequences of Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s title sequences are miniatures of his movies, confirming all of his artistic quirks and credos. They acknowledge their artificiality and still manage to be hugely entertaining in their own right.
Yearbook 2013: Alex Robertson

Yearbook 2013: Alex Robertson

The critical response to To the Wonder, so disheartening in its near-unanimous exasperation, seems to me incommensurate with the movie itself, which I watched and loved one idle December night after a copy of it had landed in my lap.
Yearbook 2013: Will Noah

Yearbook 2013: Will Noah

Computer Chess is nothing less than an origin myth: a glance at the moment when the difference between people and computers first became indiscernible. Its miniscule budget and limited setting might make it look small, but its intellectual reach is encyclopedic.
Yearbook 2013: Theo Zenou

Yearbook 2013: Theo Zenou

The ‘Rotten Tomatoes’ or ‘Metacritic’ effect means, beyond their initial critical reception, films are often denied the opportunity to reach their intended audiences. This year I cannot think of a film more critically maligned and shamelessly overlooked than M. Night Shyamalan’s After Earth.
In Focus: Claire Denis

In Focus: Claire Denis

For Denis, the image is the foundation of plot, a theme to explore and, it seems, the fuel needed for filmmaking itself.
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