Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Features
Black Sheep: All These Women

Black Sheep: All These Women

Structurally one can readily notice that Bergman was trying to participate in the touch-and-go slapstick style of comedy he had watched as a child--yet this homage all too often registers as an attempt to gratify the director himself, and not its audience.
The Watermelon Woman

The Watermelon Woman

Double Exposure is celebrating the 20th anniversary of Cheryl Dunye's iconic debut, The Watermelon Woman, by posting a newly edited version of Alex Robertson's longform piece on the film from our 8th print issue.
Sound & Vision: Midnight Cowboy

Sound & Vision: Midnight Cowboy

Adulthood, one gathers, is the process of becoming one’s self, of shedding pretend play and impossible dreams in exchange for a fuller sense of self-recognition.
Jane and Charlotte Forever: A Family Legacy of Female Transgression

Jane and Charlotte Forever: A Family Legacy of Female Transgression

In both Gainsbourg and Birkin’s films, female characters dismantle structures that are commonly criticized in feminist film theory, but often they go even further.
2015 Year End Poll

2015 Year End Poll

This year's Double Exposure poll was the most diverse we ever had. Save three, each contributor had a different vote for the best film of 2015. Below are the tabulated results as well as some thoughts from our contributors on their top film.
Summer Views: Rem Berger

Summer Views: Rem Berger

It is extremely engaging to witness Brian’s descent into madness and his recovery from it side by side. The pacing is excellent—although the film builds towards two separate climaxes, they seemingly progress as one.
NYFF 2015: Spotlight on Documentary

NYFF 2015: Spotlight on Documentary

Our NYFF coverage continues with Alex Robertson's "Christgau capsules" for three documentaries.
Summer Views: Alex Robertson

Summer Views: Alex Robertson

It feels as if the post-capitalist utopia which Straub and Huillet envision will have no place for visual delectation, or depth of feeling, and certainly not humor. Sounds sorta regressive, doesn’t it?
Summer Views: Sophie Kovel

Summer Views: Sophie Kovel

Iris documents its subject’s endless curiosity and curiosities alongside an unyielding passion for her work that only grows with age.
Summer Views: Hunter Koch

Summer Views: Hunter Koch

From then on, my mom and I spent countless weekends driving three hours to watch a weekend’s worth of movies in Omaha, something of a revelation for a kid from the prairie.
Summer Views: David Quintas

Summer Views: David Quintas

Accordingly, I noted how she used idiosyncrasies to convey her character’s emotional state and something larger about her role in the company. Without her performance being singled out, I would have missed such subtleties.
Summer Views: Matthew Rivera

Summer Views: Matthew Rivera

For Rohmer, himself a cinephile of the most avid variety, summer is not a time of planned activity so much as planned inactivity that, in turn, allows for only the most passive of vacations.
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