Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
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A Cinema for the People: Sátántangó

A Cinema for the People: Sátántangó

The primary reason that Sátántangó is so able to lift its weight across seven-and-a-half hours is because its main vocabulary of long takes naturally generates a blood flow of images that is consistent in tone and utterly hypnotizing.
Retrospective Review: Amour Fou

Retrospective Review: Amour Fou

Basing Amour Fou upon this ridiculous story from early 19th century Germany, Hausner presents the impossibility of romantic love.
Mike Nichols Symposium Part I

Mike Nichols Symposium Part I

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A mere four years after the play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? premiered on Broadway, Mike Nichols made his directorial debut with a film adaptation of this classic American play. Hewing remarkably close to playwright Edward Albee’s script, which mined the rich quarry of marriage dysfunction, the film unfolds in...
Best Movies of 2018

Best Movies of 2018

As per tradition, Double Exposure took an extra month to catch up on all the best movies that came out last year, but our hotly anticipated list is finally here! In addition to contributing the individual top 10s from which we built our top 15, our staff has also written a little bit about some films, whether...
NYFF 2018: Wildlife

NYFF 2018: Wildlife

The directorial debut of actor Paul Dano organizes familiar faces, subjects and themes into a new, and moving, pattern.
Like Me

Like Me

It’s quite easy to condemn teenagers when they publish a series of transgressive videos on Youtube just to get clicks. But sometimes, video clips go viral without an attention-seeking motive. The 2017 film Like Me juggles the relationship between this un-beseeching fame and its spiraling negative effects. It also entertains the idea of how reality...
Wild Boys

Wild Boys

Four strutting teenage boys played by four strutting teenage girls compose the magnetic centerpiece of Bertrand Mandico’s heady debut feature, Wild Boys (Les garçons sauvages), which had its New York premiere on February 24th at The Film Society of Lincoln Center.  Supremely bizarre, extraordinarily thoughtful, and operating according to a brilliant and idiosyncratic logic all...
Women Reply

Women Reply

Varda’s portrait offers a corrective to the oftentimes even more egregiously inadequate representations that preceded it . . . it’s clear that it isn’t so much women that warrant reinventing, but our understanding of womanhood itself.
NYFF 2016: My Journey Through French Cinema

NYFF 2016: My Journey Through French Cinema

In trying to pierce much too quickly and much too forcefully into the truth and beauty at the heart of cinema, Tavernier unfortunately overlooks the potential wider impact of his own encounters with movies.
Double Exposure Issue Seven Now Online!

Double Exposure Issue Seven Now Online!

We’re proud to announce the launch of our Spring 2014 issue: one of the biggest and best things we’ve done. The issue kicks off with our first-ever personal essay: Michael Blair’s account of a summer trip to Galway made under the sign of Rossellini’s Voyage to Italy. Olivia Domba and Thuto Durkac Somo are responsible for...
Somebody Up There Likes Me

Somebody Up There Likes Me

Meaghan Katz reviews Bob Byington's new film Somebody Up There Likes Me now in theatres.
Double Exposure Blog Meeting

Double Exposure Blog Meeting

Interested in writing for this blog? Come to Lerner tonight, where we’ll be having our inaugural blog meeting outside Lerner 555 (on the 5th floor ramp) at 9:00 pm.
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