Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Yearly archive 2018
NYFF 2018: Sorry Angel

NYFF 2018: Sorry Angel

By the time the film draws to a close, Honoré’s made sure we’ve seen it all: plenty of mourning, sex, and smoking on picturesque Parisian bridges.
NYFF 2018: Wildlife

NYFF 2018: Wildlife

The directorial debut of actor Paul Dano organizes familiar faces, subjects and themes into a new, and moving, pattern.
NYFF 2018: Transit

NYFF 2018: Transit

In transit, relationships are evacuated of any real meaning, identity is rendered deliberately superficial and interchangeable, and what little the immigrants do own they carry with them.
Changing the Conversation: On First Reformed

Changing the Conversation: On First Reformed

First Reformed deploys a host of Protestant self-punishing trappings and conventions to fabricate a seductive spectacle out of white male guilt and self-pity.
Like Me

Like Me

It’s quite easy to condemn teenagers when they publish a series of transgressive videos on Youtube just to get clicks. But sometimes, video clips go viral without an attention-seeking motive. The 2017 film Like Me juggles the relationship between this un-beseeching fame and its spiraling negative effects. It also entertains the idea of how reality...
Wild Boys

Wild Boys

Four strutting teenage boys played by four strutting teenage girls compose the magnetic centerpiece of Bertrand Mandico’s heady debut feature, Wild Boys (Les garçons sauvages), which had its New York premiere on February 24th at The Film Society of Lincoln Center.  Supremely bizarre, extraordinarily thoughtful, and operating according to a brilliant and idiosyncratic logic all...
Women Reply

Women Reply

Varda’s portrait offers a corrective to the oftentimes even more egregiously inadequate representations that preceded it . . . it’s clear that it isn’t so much women that warrant reinventing, but our understanding of womanhood itself.
Motherhood, Friendship, and Selena: An Interview with Nellie Killian

Motherhood, Friendship, and Selena: An Interview with Nellie Killian

Guest programmed by Nellie Killian, “Tell Me” centers on intimate nonfiction films by and about women—and complicates the question of how, exactly, womanhood is understood and defined.
The Best Movies of 2017

The Best Movies of 2017

Welcome to our annual year-end poll of the best films of the year, coming to you only one month late! This year’s poll of contributors and friends of the magazine resulted in a landslide victory for Hong Sang-soo’s November release On the Beach At Night Alone, which had a 9-point lead over our number two pick. In...
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