Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Monthly archive October, 2014
Hiroshima Mon Amour

Hiroshima Mon Amour

Honoring its sensitive subject, this classic is both an emotionally charged and a thoughtfully crafted depiction of a recovering postwar world that carries the freight of its horrific past.
Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice is not one of Pynchon’s greatest novels, and this goes a long way towards explaining why Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film is just about the best Pynchon movie imaginable.
Lost and Found Film Club at Spectacle

Lost and Found Film Club at Spectacle

Standing among the fifteen or so people lining the wall at Spectacle, Zena and Brendt begin to describe what is in store for us: a ‘50s stag film featuring a very lovely, awkward lady with strangely shaped pasties, a Pasadena police station training video from the ‘70s on when to use a shotgun or a...
Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik

These are problematic that become increasingly relevant in an age where our social and visual relations are more and more defined by our technologies. Increasingly the push against these factors has increased, but Paik’s exhibit asks us to find something different in these problems: joy.
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

It is so completely Williams: the nuanced relationships, the decidedly Southern feel, the patient appreciation for quiet. Though it’s unconventional, even by Williams’ own standards, the movie is beautiful in its own right.
Tusk

Tusk

While the overall tone does switch from a dark, unnerving apprehensiveness in the first half to an outrageous, over-the-top absurdity, this does not seem to be a defect of the film, but rather a means of creating a truly original and memorable dark comedy.
Cannes Capsules

Cannes Capsules

Mommy leaves a strange aftertaste, a too-bright bitterness, mostly thanks to Pilon’s impressive slippage into his role...Mommy is provocative and funny, brilliant and frank, and altogether better than any of Dolan’s four previous films.
Boyhood

Boyhood

Rem Berger reviews Richard Linklater's twelve-year experiment, Boyhood.
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