Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Yearly archive 2014
Lili Marleen

Lili Marleen

Fassbinder excessively repeats the song throughout the movie, often juxtaposing it with scenes of war, death and destruction. This combination creates cynical distance, a mordant comment on the absurdity of the war.
Chinese Puzzle

Chinese Puzzle

Jonas Zimmerman reviews Cédric Klapisch's new film, Chinese Puzzle
Seymour: An Introduction

Seymour: An Introduction

Alex Robertson reviews Ethan Hawke's new Seymour: An Introduction
Waters Waters Everywhere

Waters Waters Everywhere

There were indeed multiple maniacs.
Second Dimensions: You Are Your Own Voyeur

Second Dimensions: You Are Your Own Voyeur

Scarlett Johansson as the alien skinwalker in Under the Skin becomes her own voyeur, internalizing the reactions of others, imagining and wondering about her body as an object.
La Petite Lise

La Petite Lise

Jean Grémillon's brooding and masterful early sound film – unavailable on DVD – screens Saturday 11/22 at 4:30 at the Museum of the Moving Image.
Whiplash

Whiplash

When he was a teenager, Charlie “Yardbird” Parker got a chance to play with Jo Jones, drummer for Count Basie’s Orchestra. Midway through the performance, Parker lost the beat, Jones threw a cymbal at him, and the crowd laughed him off the stage. Legend has it that Parker muttered “I’ll be back” as he exited...
The Donovan Affair at Film Forum

The Donovan Affair at Film Forum

The experience itself was a history of film condensed into an hour and half; at first people laughed with each newly added telephone ring and footstep, but after the amusement of this novelty wore off, we had progressed all the way from 1894 to 2014.
Hiroshima Mon Amour

Hiroshima Mon Amour

Honoring its sensitive subject, this classic is both an emotionally charged and a thoughtfully crafted depiction of a recovering postwar world that carries the freight of its horrific past.
Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice is not one of Pynchon’s greatest novels, and this goes a long way towards explaining why Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film is just about the best Pynchon movie imaginable.
Lost and Found Film Club at Spectacle

Lost and Found Film Club at Spectacle

Standing among the fifteen or so people lining the wall at Spectacle, Zena and Brendt begin to describe what is in store for us: a ‘50s stag film featuring a very lovely, awkward lady with strangely shaped pasties, a Pasadena police station training video from the ‘70s on when to use a shotgun or a...
Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik

These are problematic that become increasingly relevant in an age where our social and visual relations are more and more defined by our technologies. Increasingly the push against these factors has increased, but Paik’s exhibit asks us to find something different in these problems: joy.
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