Welcome to the blog of Double Exposure, Columbia University's undergraduate film journal. We publish up-to-date film criticism by Columbia students, including reviews, features, columns, lists, videos, interviews, podcasts, and more.
Mike Nichols Symposium Part I

Mike Nichols Symposium Part I

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A mere four years after the play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? premiered on Broadway, Mike Nichols made his directorial debut with a film adaptation of this classic American play. Hewing remarkably close to playwright Edward Albee’s script, which mined the rich quarry of marriage...
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Best Movies of 2018

Best Movies of 2018

As per tradition, Double Exposure took an extra month to catch up on all the best movies that came out last year, but our hotly anticipated list is finally here! In addition to contributing the individual top 10s from which we built our top 15, our staff has also written a little bit about some films, whether...
NYFF 2018: Burning

NYFF 2018: Burning

The characters in Burning, director Lee Chang-dong’s newest film, exist apart from one another. Even in scenes together they appear to inhabit separate layers of the frame; it’s like they’re superimposed upon one another to create the illusion of proximity while they remain irrevocably isolated.
NYFF 2018: Private Life

NYFF 2018: Private Life

Private Life is a heartwarming, at times heartbreaking, work that succeeds in uniting stereotypes, tropes, and genres to remind viewers of the power in “dramedy.”
NYFF 2018: Roma

NYFF 2018: Roma

Nevertheless, there is enormous power in Cuarón’s decision to frame an epic-scale narrative about Mexico in transition around an indigenous woman; one who speaks in her native mixteca as well as Spanish, who enacts a coveted cinematic role as central voyeur, who brings the viewer into each of many worlds in collision.
NYFF 2018: The Times of Bill Cunningham

NYFF 2018: The Times of Bill Cunningham

The beauty of this documentary lies in its ability to forefront Cunningham’s impression of himself without pandering to the audience, hungry for anecdotes to establish a sense of closeness to Cunningham—a reluctant celebrity whose work hinges on his ability to disappear into the sidewalk.
NYFF 2018: The Grand Bizarre

NYFF 2018: The Grand Bizarre

The textiles, each unique and colorful individually, combine to form a cohesive body of art that seems to transcend borders.
NYFF 2018: The Other Side of the Wind

NYFF 2018: The Other Side of the Wind

In considering The Other Side of the Wind as Orson Welles’s final statement, one must come to terms with the fact that it is no longer really his film.
NYFF 2018: Sorry Angel

NYFF 2018: Sorry Angel

By the time the film draws to a close, Honoré’s made sure we’ve seen it all: plenty of mourning, sex, and smoking on picturesque Parisian bridges.
NYFF 2018: Wildlife

NYFF 2018: Wildlife

The directorial debut of actor Paul Dano organizes familiar faces, subjects and themes into a new, and moving, pattern.
NYFF 2018: Transit

NYFF 2018: Transit

In transit, relationships are evacuated of any real meaning, identity is rendered deliberately superficial and interchangeable, and what little the immigrants do own they carry with them.
Changing the Conversation: On First Reformed

Changing the Conversation: On First Reformed

First Reformed deploys a host of Protestant self-punishing trappings and conventions to fabricate a seductive spectacle out of white male guilt and self-pity.
Like Me

Like Me

It’s quite easy to condemn teenagers when they publish a series of transgressive videos on Youtube just to get clicks. But sometimes, video clips go viral without an attention-seeking motive. The 2017 film Like Me juggles the relationship between this un-beseeching fame and its spiraling negative effects. It also entertains the idea of how reality...
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